Lost Command (Columbia Pictures) (1968)

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(Mat 2A: Still No. 99) Anthony Quinn, as a fearless French Army paratroop commander, prepares to lead his men into battle against Algerian guerillas in this scene from Mark Robson's production of "Lost Command," new Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor. Also starred are Alain Delon, right, Michele Morgan, George Segal, Maurice Ronet, left, and Claudia Cardinale as Aicha. The action drama is based on Jean Larteguy's best-selling novel, ''The Centurions." Lost Command’ Review SSSp>p>p>SSSSSSsSSSsSsSSsSsSsS565c A drama of men and women in war, in the kind of war where no quarter is asked or given, Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command” is a motion picture that not only stands by itself as an absorbing adventure drama, but it also serves as something of a marker for our times. It is a page out of recent history, with a meaning for today. “Lost Command” is the story of a group of French paratroopers who have been defeated at Dien Bien Phu but achieve some measure of success in the later war against Algeria. “Lost Command” ends with its soldiers being rewarded for their efforts, just around the corner from where an Algerian boy is painting the defiant word “Independence” on a wall. Starred in the film are Anthony Quinn, as the paratroop commander who does whatever needs doing, just so long as he can achieve a victory; Alain Delon, as a young officer serving under Quinn, sensitive, but still able to beat up the Algerian girl he loves in order to force her into betraying her own brother; George Segal, as the brother, a former French Army officer now fighting for his native Algeria; Michele Morgan, as the aristocratic French countess who is attracted to the lusty, war-loving Quinn and helps him achieve his ambitions; Maurice Ronet, as another of Quinn’s officers, a man who. cold-bloodedly kills whatever stands in his way. Claudia Cardinale is seen as Aicha, the girl whose romance with French officer Delon ends in nightmare, and Gregoire Aslan is co-starred as a gentle Algerian doctor who leads the fight for freedom. Nelson Gidding wrote the screenplay for “Lost Command,” based on the international bestselling novel, “The Centurions,” by Jean Larteguy. Robson produced and directed, making “‘Lost Command” a worthy successor to such other of his films as “Von Ryan’s Express,” “Champion,” “Home of the Brave,” “The Inn of the Sixth Happiness” and “Peyton Place,” to name but a few. John R. Sloan served as associate producer for the Red Lion Production, and the music was written by Franz Waxman. Truly International Motion picture actors, technicians and administrative personnel must be prepared to circle the globe at short notice. This is well illustrated by Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command,” new actionadventure drama of French colonial warfare in Indo-China and Algeria, filmed in Spain for Columbia Pictures release and now Pt i eee Theatre, in Panavision and Columbiacolor. “Lost Command” stars Anthony Quinn, Alain Delon, George Segal, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet and Claudia Cardinale as Aicha and co-star Gregoire Aslan, Producer-director Robson is American, but he is familiar with overseas filming of such pictures as “Von Ryan’s Express” (in Rome, Spain and Hollywood) and “Nine Hours to Rama” (in England and India). Robson managed a veritable United Nations on his set; his cast and erew spoke English, Spanish, French, Italian, Arabic and some even used international sign language. Quinn is Mexican-born, and now lives in Rome. Segal is an American who lives in California and New York City. Delon, Miss Morgan and Ronet are French and lives in Paris. Miss Cardinale was born in Tunis, but lives in Rome. All speak English, but collectively they also could converse in French, Spanish, Italian, Greek and Arabic, Among the supporting players who came to Madrid were distinguished French actors Jean Servais, Jacques Marin and Page 10 Jean-Paul Moulinot. Portraying French paratroopers were Syl Lamont from Hollywood, Dutch-born Simino, Jean Claude Bereq, Maurice Sarfati and American-born Gordon Heath, all living in Paris. Others were Spanish actors Aldo Sanbrell and Chile-born Andres Monreal who play Algerian terrorists, Chinese Bert Lwouk (from London) who portrays a Vietnamese officer and American Howard Hagan, a resident of Madrid who plays a helicopter pilot. Academy-award winning cinematographer Robert Surtees from Hollywood led an AIllAmerican camera unit. Also American are film editor Dorothy Spencer and Fred Tuch, who was second unit director. Associate producer John Sloan came from England as did art director John Stoll, who won an Academy Award for his work on “Lawrence of Arabia.” The film’s dress designer, Tanine Autry, is from Paris. This international company worked successfully together for six months, filming in some 70 differentand rugged set-ups, ranging from the Guaderrama Mountains outside Madrid, on interior and exterior Madrid locations, to the Malaga docks, Torremolinos Beach and arid mountain plateaus of Almeria. Nelson Gidding wrote the screenplay for ‘Lost Command” based on the novel, “The Centurions” by Jean Larteguy. Franz Waxman wrote the music for the Red Lion production. Anthony Quinn Being bi-lingual is an asset but, for an actor, the knowledge of several languages has immeasurable advantages. Anthony Quinn, as a ruthless French army officer in Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command,” the Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor, at the Theatre, converses in at least four languages and he is living proof that knowing more than English pays off in dividends. “Lost Command” also stars Alain Delon, George Segal, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet and Claudia Cardinale as Aicha and co-stars Gregoire Aslan. The picture was filmed in Spain and Quinn’s knowledge of Spanish helped him the moment he alighted from his plane in Madrid. “T spoke to the boys and girls from the press and magazines in their own language,’ Quinn recalls. “I answered their questions in their own idom and even asked them questions about themselves. It made the interviews warm and personal.” Later on, as the company worked in Madrid and on locations in Malaga and Almeria in Southeast Spain, Quinn’s knowledge of the language continued to pay off; he could talk with the Spanish crew, technical advisers and members of the cast, as well as the people who came to watch. With Alain Delon, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet, Jean Claude Bereq, Maurice Sarfati and other French actors, Quinn’s fluency in their languige helped again. A picture like “Lost Command,” story of the French paratroopers who fought in both Indo-China and Algeria, attracts correspondents from all over the world, most of whom speak only in their own tongue, Quinn’s knowledge of Spanish, Italian and French came in handy. “It’s a good thing for anyone to learn languages,” Quinn asserts, “but today, with films being made all over the world, knowing several languages is essential for actors,” and proof of this is Anthony Quinn. Nelson Gidding wrote the sereenplay for “Lost Command” based on the novel, “The Centurions” by Jean Larteguy. John R. Sloan was the associate producer on the Red Lion Production, and Franz Waxman wrote the music. He Was There No one had to show Alain Delon how to portray a soldier of Dien Bien Phu, the wind-up battle of the French campaign in Indo-China, in Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command,” the Columbia Pictures release at these 8 Theatre in Columbiacolor and Panavision. Delon fought there with the French. “Lost Command” stars Anthony Quinn, Delon, George eoees ewes Segal, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet with Claudia Cardinale as Aicha. Mark Robson produced and directed the film, based on Jean Larteguy’s best-selling novel, “The Centurions.” (Mat IC; Still No. 113) Anthony Quinn and Michele Morgan take time out for romance in Mark Robson's production of "Lost Command," Columbia Pictures release in which Quinn plays a French paratroop officer. Also starred in Panavision and Columbiacolor are Alain Delon, George Segal, Maurice Ronet and Claudia Cardinale. Trains for Role Most moviegoers seldom realize what actors have to go through in order to prepare for a role. Anthony Quinn, starring in Mark Robson’s production of “Tost Command,” the Columbia Pictures release at the... .Theatre in Panavision and Columbiacolor, had to condition himself rather rigorously for his part, that of a French paratrooper colonel. “Lost Command” stars Quinn, Alain Delon, George Segal Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet and Claudia Cardinale as Aicha. Robson produced and directed from the Nelson Gidding screenplay based on Jean Larteguy’s novel, “The Centurions,” which deals with the French paratroopers who met defeat at Dien Bien Phu and later in Algeria. In the film, Quinn faced a great physical challenge. Cast with a group of younger men, he had to measure up to their standards in rugged physical activity. Quinn went into training a month before the cameras rolled. He climbed cliffs and jogged from five to ten miles in road work daily. During production, Quinn kept in trim by swimming and playing tennis. George Segal More and more, movie-goers are joining the George Segal fan club. Segal, who has been seen in quite a few pictures over the past two years, currently stars with Anthony Quinn, Alain Delon, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet, Claudia Cardinale as Aicha and co-star Gregoire Aslan in Mark Robson’s production of “Tost Command,” the Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor at the ...... Theatre. Segal was seen briefly in “The Young Doctors,” “The Longest Day” and “Act One,” then he starred in “The NEW Interns,” ”*Ship of Fools,’ and the title role in “King Rat.”’ Coming up is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton as his co-stars. Producer-director Mark Robson cast Segal as the French paratroop officer who turns Algerian guerilla leader in “Lost Command.” Robson knew a good thing when he saw it. How does a guy feel who’s just “made it big’ in international filmdom? “It’s a funny feeling,’ George says, and admits he still has a long way to go. “Naturally, I want to be a star like Cary Grant or Jack Lemmon. There’s an awful lot of hard work ahead to have those things happen, if that day ever comes.” George himself is playing it cool, calm and collected. “There’s plenty of time for me,” he says. “T learn a lot in every movie. I learned from Anthony Quinn, whom I respect as an actor, and who had a lot of bad days before he got his break.” Nelson Gidding wrote the screenplay for “Lost Command” based on the novel, “The Centurions” by Jean Larteguy. John R. Sloan was the associate producer on the Red Lion Production and Franz Waxman wrote the music. (Mat IA; Still No. 130) Claudia Cardinale as Aicha and Alain Delon as a French paratroop officer, star in "Lost Command," Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor. The Mark Robson production also stars Anthony Quinn, George Segal, Michele Morgan and Maurice Ronet. Alain Delon Alain Delon, currently starred les ee Theatre in Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command,” new Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor, has variously been compared to James Dean and Tyrone Power. He is, in effect, a handsome young French actor, brilliantly capable of playing both “rebel” and “romance” roles. In “Lost Command,” in which he is seen as a paratroop officer under Anthony Quinn’s command, Delon plays a character who is both rebel and romantic; he also is tough, athletic and grimly aware of the tactics necessary for modern battlefield survival, Others in the “Lost Command,” cast include George Segal, Michele Morgan, Maurice Ronet with Claudia Cardinale as Aicha and co-star Gregoire Aslan. Delon, born in a small suburb of Paris, was 17 when he enlisted in the French Marines and then discovered he could not set foot on a ship without becoming seasick. The next five years were spent between sick bay and ship’s brig, because he also disliked naval discipline. Transferred from the Navy to the Army, young Delon was sent to fight in Indo-China, where some of the battle action and story content of “Lost Command” takes place. On his discharge from the army, Delon found himself at loose ends in Paris and joined a group of friends on a visit to the Cannes Film Festival. His handsome appearance and bright personality prompted a talent scout to give him a film test. Delon’s films, in Europe and America, include such pictures as “Purple Noon,” which was rated the best picture of the year in Japan; “Rocco and His Brothers,’ “The Leopard,” and “Any Number Can Win.” Recently he starred in “The Yellow Rolls Royce,” with Ingrid Bergman and Rex Harrison; “Once a Thief,’ with Ann-Margret and “Joy House,’ with Jane Fonda. Nelson Gidding wrote the screenplay for “Lost Command” based on the best-selling novel, “The Centurions” by Jean Larteguy. John R. Sloan was the associate producer of the Red Lion Production, which Robson both directed and produced. The music is by Franz Waxman. Advance Notice Anthony Quinn and Alain Delon top the cast of Mark Robson’s production of “Lost Command,’ Columbia Pictures release in Panavision and Columbiacolor which opens ...... at the Theatre. The film, based on Jean Larteguy’s bestselling novel, “The Centurions,” also stars George Segal, Michele Morgan and Maurice Ronet, with Claudia Cardinale as Aicha, and co-stars Gregoire Aslan, Nelson Gidding wrote the screenplay from which Robson produced and directed the film. John R. Sloan was the associate producer on the Red Lion Production, and the music is by Franz Waxman.